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Community Woodlands Workshop

posted on November 14, 2013

The first of two practical workshops took place last Saturday, at East Horsley in Surrey, on woodland management planning and community engagement for people involved in community-owned and -managed woodlands.  Part of the Good Woods project, the workshop was designed to support community woodland groups in undertaking effective stewardship of their woodlands.

In the morning session, Paul Orsi (Sylva Foundation) spoke to the group about how to develop a vision for their woodland and how they could use the Woodland Star Rating to measure the level of woodland management that they are practising based on the UK Forestry Standard.  Matthew Woodcock (Forestry Commission) gave an update on grants available through the Forestry Commission as well as information of the range of pests and diseases currently affecting our trees.  Amy Hammond (Lantern) explained the importance of actively engaging with stakeholders in the community surrounding a woodland and highlighted the Community Engagement Toolkit which has been designed to help woodland owners and managers through this process.  The last presentation of the morning came from Jon Whitehead who is part of a volunteer group which helps to look after the gardens and woodlands in Nonsuch Park (Surrey).  Jon described the group’s experiences in setting up a new volunteering group and how they engage with people using the woodland.

The afternoon session was out in the woods where Paul and Matthew gave a practical demonstration on how to interpret your woodland and carry out a basic woodland inventory.

The second of these workshops is being held at Marston Vale Forest Centre, Bedfordshire on Saturday 23rd November 2013, 9.30am to 3.30pm where lunch and refreshments will be provided.  To register for your free place at one of these events by emailing events@lantern.uk.com.


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com


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Good Woods community woodland workshops – 9th & 23rd November

posted on October 29, 2013

Two practical workshops on woodland management planning and community engagement are being held for people involved in community-owned and managed woodlands.

As part of the Good Woods project, the two workshops are aimed at supporting community woodland groups to undertake effective management of their woodlands. The workshops are free to attend: see booking details below.

Event details

What's in a woodland - demonstration sessions will be run to help community woodland groups identify and measure trees in their woods.

What’s in a woodland – demonstration sessions will be run to help community woodland groups identify and measure trees in their woods.

Community woodland groups play an important role in the ongoing stewardship of Britain’s woodlands. However, groups can struggle to find the right support to help achieve their aims.

This event will provide you with information and free resources to enable you to:

  • Develop your own woodland management plan
  • Access grants and support for woodland management
  • Identify local woodland contractors to work in your woodland
  • Engage with local stakeholders and the wider community
  • Understand the range of pests and diseases that currently threaten UK woodlands and best practice guidance on dealing with them

Speakers and topics confirmed so far include:

  • Forestry Commission- update on funding and pests and diseases
  • Sylva Foundation – resources to help begin the management process and develop your management plan
  • Lantern UK – introduction to the Good woods project and the community engagement toolkit

A practical woodland inventory demonstration session will take place in a woodland local to the venue in the afternoon.

Woodland management professionals will be on hand to advise you on aspects of management such as surveying and managing your woodlands for a range of benefits.

The day will include an introduction to the Community Engagement Toolkit.  This toolkit has been designed to help you to engage with your local community and other stakeholders that you may need to communicate with as part of your woodland work and in the process of developing a UK Forestry Standard management plan.

Dates & venues

The workshop will be held in two locations:

  • East Horsley Village Hall, Surrey on Saturday 9th November 2013, 9.30am – 3.30pm
  • Marston Vale Forest Centre, Bedfordshire on Saturday 23rd November 2013, 9.30am to 3.30pm.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided at both events.

Bookings

Register for your free place at one of these events by emailing: events@lantern.uk.com.

Please state your preferred date and venue and provide details of any special dietary requirements when you book.

Please pass this invitation on to anyone you think may be interested in attending.

Best wishes,

The Good Woods team

 


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com

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Good Woods at the Woodland Communications Day – 15th November

posted on October 28, 2013

Julia Griffin (B&Q) and the Alistair Yeomans (Sylva Foundation) from the Good Woods project will both be speaking at the Woodland Communications day at Horringer Community Centre on the 15th November.

Additionally members from the Grown in Britain team will explain how people can become involved with the movement and also set out the basis for the GiB accreditation scheme.

The Forestry Commission will be at the event and will present on a number of subjects including apprenticeship schemes and the latest news on forestry grants.

Other organisations presenting include: Natural England, Orchard Barn Project, Lockhart & Garratt and British Ash Exports. The subjects covered will be varied and range from woodland management on SSSI to timber markets for ash.

Please find full details of the event and how to register here: 2013 Woodland Communications Day Programme & Booking.

The Sylva Foundation would like thank Garry Battell and his colleagues of Suffolk County Council for organising this celebration of the great work that is being carried out in British woodlands.


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com

Category: events, Good Woods
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Good Woods passes its first century during Grown in Britain week

posted on October 17, 2013

As the end of Grown in Britain week nears, the team behind the Good Woods project announces that over 100 woodlands, covering an area of under-managed woodland the size of 13,000 football pitches, has been supported.

Good Woods is a pioneering joint initiative between DIY retailer B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation, supported by Lantern. Together they are:

  • Providing professional forestry advice and woodland planning tools to owners of under-managed woods across the south East and East of England
  • Strengthening links between communities and woodlands by communicating the benefits of working woodlands to society
  • Aiming to improve the markets for woodland products so that forestry can further contribute to the growth of the green economy

Good Woods is making a strong contribution to Grown in Britain – a new, Government-backed initiative to help Britain further understand and value our nation’s trees and woodlands. Grown in Britain aims to create a strong wood culture by providing more jobs in the forestry sector, improving woodland habitats for nature and creating more places for people to exercise and enjoy the countryside. It is now widely considered that this multi-purpose approach is essential for creating a sustainable future for Britain’s woodlands.

Some images showing the work of Good Woods during 2013

Sue Riddlestone, Chief Executive of BioRegional, said: “Good Woods is all about a better future for our woodlands. We want local people to enjoy them, wildlife to thrive in them, masses of carbon to be stored in them and for these woods to produce more useful products, helping the bottom line of Great Britain plc.”

Alistair Yeomans Chief Operating Officer of the Sylva Foundation, said: “Through Good Woods we are providing direct support to owners and managers of woodland. We are working with local land stewardship organisations to link local forestry professionals with woodland owners. We believe that focussing support to bring woodlands back into a good ecological and economic condition lays a strong foundation for a thriving ‘wood culture’.”

Key to the success of Good Woods to date has been identifying existing stakeholders with the necessary local knowledge to identify woodland owners in need of support, then providing them with woodland management resources. Working with a network of organisations ranging from Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty to Wildlife Trusts has been central to Good Woods’ inclusive ethos.

Through this network, Good Woods has now signed up over 100 woodlands in the south east and east of England covering 7,800 hectares and provided advice based on the UK Forestry Standard. The UKFS sets out the approach of the UK governments to sustainable forest management. www.forestry.gov.uk/ukfs

The Forestry Commission has already started to feel the positive effect by confirming that it has received several management plan applications following Good Woods visits to woodlands.

Sonia Hutton-Taylor, whose four hectare woodland in the South East of England has benefited from a Good Woods visit, said: “I wasn’t sure what to expect but, despite all the training days I have engaged with, I can see that one can’t beat a more tailored approach than a visit from a forestry expert to a woodland.” She continued: “In this respect the Good Woods program is inspired and I am delighted to have been an early recipient of that support from a forestry professional like Paul (the Good Woods Advisor)”.

 

The Woodland Star Rating

Woodland management planning is key in enabling neglected woodlands to fulfil their potential for people and nature. But it can be a slow process and some owners don’t immediately see why it is needed. To help, Good Woods created a Woodland Star Rating (WSR), a light touch approach to management planning that enables woodland owners to get a feel for what the UKFS involves.

The WSR, based on a simple checklist, enables people to measure how their woodland management activities match up to the UKFS. A score is then calculated for these activities and factors in the level of ecosystem services that the woodland is deemed to provide. These services or benefits include carbon storage, quality of habitats and the products and services provided. Owners can easily download a certificate with their Woodland Star Rating which helps them demonstrate their level of woodland stewardship.

The idea is to support owners in improving their woodlands by identifying what further actions they can take. The rating scheme is available to all woodland owners free-of-charge as part of the myForest service developed and managed by the Sylva Foundation: http://www.sylva.org.uk/myforest/wsr

Alvecote Wood (7 ha) near Tamworth was the first woodland to receive a gold star in July, closely followed by Blenheim Palace Estate in Oxfordshire (over 500ha +).

 

Community engagement – promoting the benefits of forest management

A vital part of growing a thriving wood culture is to get local communities more involved in their nearby woods across all age groups. Good Woods is achieving this by running workshops and providing resources to increase awareness and understanding of the benefits of carrying out woodland work.

 

Good Woods is also further developing a Community Engagement Toolkit for woodland owners and managers, originally funded by the Forestry Commission, to provide clear information and resources to woodland owners and managers on developing and building community relations.

 

Bringing UK timber to market

Goods Woods will present a road map of the current UK wood supply chain, from our national woodland resource through to woodland products in national supply chains. This process will help identify the potential for bringing more timber from British woodlands to market and how B&Q, as one example, could access a greater volume of home-grown timber – thereby generating the market pull to fund woodland management work which in turn will lead to healthy and productive woodlands.

 

A forest product producer pack for woodland owners is also being developed to help them assess the timber species, volumes and product potential from their woodlands.

 


NOTES FOR EDITORS

 

Grown in Britain

Grown in Britain week runs from 14-20 October 2013. Find out more about the initiative at www.growninBritain.org

 

B&Q

B&Q is the leading home improvement and garden centre retailer in UK. Its parent company, Kingfisher PLC is Europe’s leading home improvement retail group and the third largest in the world.. In 2011 B&Q reached a milestone having ensured that 100% of timber products it buys globally can be traced back to well-managed sources. Building on this success B&Q is now focussing on the UK market with the aim of creating sustainable, long-term working woodlands in the UK that will provide environmental, educational, social and economic value.

 

BioRegional

BioRegional is an entrepreneurial charity which establishes sustainable businesses and works with partners around the world to demonstrate that a sustainable future can be easy, attractive and affordable. We call our approach One Planet Living. BioRegional has previously pioneered projects to obtain useful woodfuel and charcoal from UK woodlands while conserving them. www.bioregional.com

 

The Sylva Foundation

The Sylva Foundation is a forestry charity working to revive Britain’s wood culture. It supports about 950 woodland owners across Britain in managing their woodlands sustainably through its myForest service. It also undertakes a range of science and education initiatives. www.sylva.org.uk

 

Lantern

Lantern is an innovative environmental organisation that works to make a difference to companies, communities and the environment. It has extensive experience and knowledge of developing wood supply chains across the UK, working with woodland owners, wood processes and end users.


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com


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New woodland owner benefits from Good Woods visit

posted on

Sonia Hutton-Taylor recently bought a small woodland (part of a much larger 90 acre woodland in southern Hampshire).  Sonia is a medical professional but in recent years her passion has turned to woodlands with her dream being fulfilled in January when she bought the woodland.  Sonia received a Good Woods visit from Paul Orsi (Sylva Foundation) with a view to assessing how she could improve her stewardship of the woodland.  They were joined on the visit by Sarah Greenaway, Senior Brand Manager for B&Q’s One Planet Home programme (http://www.diy.com/eco).

deadwood habitat in Sonia’s wood

Deadwood habitat in Sonia’s woodland

Sonia was keen to understand how she could start to manage her woodland, what products she could reasonably expect to get out of it and how she could do this while improving the woodland for biodiversity and amenity.  Paul explained the principals of sustainable timber yield and emphasised the importance of writing a management plan.  Economies of scale are important in such a small woodland and therefore Paul encouraged Sonia to collaborate with the other owners of the woodland to be able to bring viable volumes of timber to the market.

“I wasn’t sure what to expect from the visit but, despite all the training days I have engaged with, I can see that one can’t beat a more tailored approach to ones’ own patch from an expert. In this respect the Good Woods program is inspired and I am delighted to be able to have been an early recipient of that support from someone like Paul”. Sonia Hutton-Taylor


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com

Category: Good Woods, myForest
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Good Woods provides support to National Trust property

posted on October 11, 2013
The woodlands at Ashdown House

The woodlands at Ashdown House, National Trust

Good Woods advisor, Paul Orsi (Sylva Foundation) visited the National Trust owned Ashdown Estate this week to discuss the future management of woodlands that surround the 17th Century Ashdown House.  Paul was invited by Richard Jackson, who manages the estate, and Andy Foley the resident Ranger.

The woodlands at Ashdown estate are a very prominent feature in the landscape, being surrounded by downland at the top of the Ridgeway.  They form part of the historic landscape around the house, the central feature being a large avenue leading directly from the woodland giving views to the Ridgeway and beyond.

Richard was keen to receive advice from Paul about restoring the hazel coppice back into a working cycle to produce woodland products and improve habitat structure.  He was also interested in how to most sensitively convert an area of conifer woodland back into native broadleaves.

Paul suggested that a detailed management plan should be written for the woodland and that there would be a grants available from the Forestry Commission for this.  As well as giving clarity to the vision for the woodland the management plan would provide maximum flexibility for woodland operations by providing felling permissions for 10 years.


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com


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Woodland Star Rating presentation at FC and Defra woodland management seminar

posted on October 10, 2013

At the end of last month Alistair Yeomans of the Sylva Foundation was invited to give a presentation to members of Forestry Commission England and Defra on the Good Woods project.

The purpose of the seminar was to provide an overview of a number of recent projects that aim to assist efforts to bring more woodlands into management and to increase new planting. Presentations were also given on behalf of URS, Ipsos MORI, RDI, University of Aberdeen, CJC Consulting, James Hutton Institute and Forest Research.

The Woodland Star Rating on myForest – helping woodland owners measure the ecosystem services from their woodland

The Woodland Star Rating on myForest – helping woodland owners measure the ecosystem services from their woodland

Alistair presented details of how the Woodland Star Rating scheme that has been developed, with funding from B&Q under the Good Woods project, using evidence gathered from the British Woodlands 2012 survey.

The Woodland Star Rating enables woodland owners and managers to measure the level of woodland management being practiced, based on the UK Forestry Standard, and how this relates to the ecosystem services that their woodland provides. This in now fully functional for all myForest users.

The UK Forestry Standard provides guidelines on ecosystem services under forest productivity:

‘The maintenance of the productive potential of forests includes both timber production, which serves the development of forest industries and economic well-being, and wider non-market benefits and values such as recreation, and other ecosystem services. The essential consideration for the landowner or manager is to ensure that the forest thrives and is not degraded. This includes protecting young trees to make sure they become successfully established, and protecting the health of forests and woodlands, for example, by ensuring they have the necessary resilience to cope with emerging threats and changing conditions – in particular climate change. It also involves maintaining levels of fertility and site potential for future rotations’.

The Woodland Star Rating has been designed to help woodland owners achieve this aim.

Alan Betts’ retirement

Alan Betts gives his farewell speech to Forestry Commission and Defra colleagues on the Forestry Commission’s Alice Holt lawn

Alan Betts gives his farewell speech to Forestry Commission and Defra colleagues on the Forestry Commission’s Alice Holt lawn

Following the seminar there was a barbeque to mark the retirement of Alan Betts from the Forestry Commission. Staff at Sylva have worked closely with him over the last five years. Alan co-ordinated much of the research that was presented at the seminar and has contributed greatly to forestry and the Forestry Commission over the course of his career.


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com


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Good Woods supports landscape-scale thinking at Bracknell Forest

posted on October 8, 2013

Paul Orsi, Director for Forestry & Rural Enterprise at the Sylva Foundation, was invited by the team at Bracknell Forest Borough Council to provide a Good Woods visit to look at the issues and opportunities arising from the Borough’s 500ha of woodland.

Bracknell is a new town built mainly in the 1950s and 60s and was largely cut out of the pine woodlands which still dominate land to the south of the town.  Remnants of this woodland are found in pockets throughout the urban landscape and provide a very distinctive feel.  Paul met with members of the Parks and Countryside Team as well as the Landscape Services Team, and visited some of these remnants as well as an area of deciduous woodland that is managed by the Ranger Service.

Ranger Marie-Anne Phillips standing next to a recently coppiced hazel in Tinkers Copse

Ranger Marie-Anne Phillips standing next to a recently coppiced hazel in Tinkers Copse

It was clear that each of the teams have been undertaking some great work in the Borough’s woodland areas.  Of particular note was an area of woodland in the north of the Borough where the Ranger Service had brought hazel coppice back into management over the last 10 years.  Ranger Marie-Anne Phillips has been using local volunteer groups to cut the coppice with the produce being used for hedgelaying, bean poles and Morris Dancing sticks.  This work has created a very diverse woodland structure that is great for wildlife.

What became clear during the visit was, that as well as some great work being undertaken in the individual woodlands, there were opportunities to work more strategically across the Borough to support sustainable forest management.  Many of the pine woods are reaching maturity and now is the perfect time to be thinking about woodland at a landscape scale.  Paul encouraged the team to contact the Forestry Commission to discuss grants that are available to aid with management planning.  Paul also suggested that the woodland resource could be harnessed to provide woodfuel for community use and that grants are available through the Forestry Commission for assessing this resource.


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com


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Good Woods working with Surrey Wildlife Trust

posted on October 4, 2013
The morning session was held in Bramley Village Hall and included a presentation on timber volume assessments by Rob Davis, the Surrey Wildlife Trust Woodland Officer

The morning session was held in Bramley Village Hall and included a presentation on timber volume assessments by Rob Davis, the Surrey Wildlife Trust Woodland Officer

In September, as part of the Good Woods project, Alistair Yeomans of the Sylva Foundation contributed to a woodland management seminar organised for staff of the Surrey Wildlife Trust.

The principle aspects of developing a woodland management plan were discussed and how management planning ensures that woodland work conforms to the UK Forestry Standard.

A key step in creating a woodland plan is to map the various areas of woodland so that uniform woodland areas can be identified for planning purposes. Guidance for carrying this out can be found in the Forestry Commission England’s English Woodland Grant Scheme (EWGS) 1 guidance document. The following is taken from the document and describes how a woodland can be divided into compartments and sub-compartments for planning purposes.

Woodland properties, compartments and sub-compartments

The afternoon session was held at the woodland at Chinthurst Hill where Alistair Yeomans of the Sylva Foundation explained to Surrey Wildlife Trust staff how to divide a woodland into compartments and sub-compartments for the purposes of a woodland plan

The afternoon session was held at the woodland at Chinthurst Hill where Alistair Yeomans of the Sylva Foundation explained to Surrey Wildlife Trust staff how to divide a woodland into compartments and sub-compartments for the purposes of a woodland plan

A property is defined as the largest unit of management used in decision making. This may be made up of multiple blocks of woodlands across a landscape that is under the same ownership. The forest industry uses “compartments” and “sub-compartments” to identify discrete areas of woodland just like the parcelling system used in agriculture, where each field has a unique reference.

Compartments are discrete woodlands (or parts of larger woodlands) defined by physical features such as roads, watercourses, tracks and land use changes. Compartment boundaries (like field edges beside a road) will hardly ever change. Most small farm woodlands can be considered as one compartment.

Sub-compartments are subdivisions of these permanent compartments. The boundaries of these are defined by significant differences found inside the woodland. This will include the boundaries of different species (or simpler divisions between conifer, broadleaved or mixed areas). Also relevant are things like significant age differences between adjacent areas, fence lines and features like rides and open glades.

Minimal intervention, management planning and the UK Forestry Standard

Leo who manages the woodland at Chinthurst Hill explains to his colleagues the current coppicing operations and future plans for the woodland.

Leo who manages the woodland at Chinthurst Hill explains to his colleagues the current coppicing operations and future plans for the woodland.

Some of the woodlands that the Surrey Wildlife Trust manages are situated on environmentally sensitive sites such as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). If it is deemed that a minimal intervention approach is the best management strategy for these areas of woodlands then it is important to include these areas in the management plan, detailing why the decision has been made.

The UKFS guidance on minimum intervention is as follows:

Assess the possible areas for minimum intervention and, where these will deliver habitat objectives, allow ecological processes to develop. 

This should relate to a monitoring schedule to assess the condition of the habitat over the course of the management plan (usually ten years) to evaluate the condition of the habitat and if minimum intervention is indeed the most appropriate strategy.

Other areas of woodland that are deemed to offer productive potential (for both habitat and production purposes) should also be clearly detailed on a map which will form part of the management plan.


Good Woods - for people, for nature

Visit the Good Woods web page

The Good Woods project is a novel project aiming to breathe new life into UK woodlands. The project—a joint initiative between DIY giant B&Q, sustainability charity BioRegional and forestry charity The Sylva Foundation—will revive woodlands to provide environmental, social and economic benefits. For more information contact Amy Hammond: amy@lantern.uk.com


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A golden woodland

posted on October 3, 2013

Sylva’s CEO, Gabriel Hemery, recently attended the Small Woods skill share weekend, following an invitation to give a presentation about our wood culture (read more).

Small Woods skill sharing weekend

Small Woods skill sharing weekend. Photo Small Woods.

Speaking to an audience of about 40 woodland owners attending the event at the Green Wood Centre near Ironbridge, he outlined Sylva’s work to revive a wood culture in Britain, defining it as “the stewardship of woodlands and the use of forest produce for a sustainable future.”

He explained work underway in the Good Woods project, running in conjunction with partners B&Q and BioRegional. Gabriel introduced the Woodland Star Rating, based on the UK Forestry Standard, to the audience, explaining how it aimed to support and encourage woodland owners to further their own understanding and activities, and also to demonstrate to members of the public the great work that the owners do to support sustainability in their woodlands. As he announced that the ultimate accolade for a woodland owner under this scheme was to achieve Gold Standard, one member of the audience immediately announced that she was indeed the proud owner of a Gold Standard woodland. Completely unscripted of course, it was a wonderful moment and given the rarity of woodlands achieving this standard currently, an unlikely one. This prompted a spontaneous round of applause from all.

With thanks to Small Woods for their invitation to Sylva to speak at the event.

If you are a woodland owner in south east or east England and are interested in a visit from a Good Woods advisor, please visit our Good Woods page to find out more.

 


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