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Knife whittling workshop for educators

posted on July 8, 2016

We are pleased to offer a half-day workshop designed for Forest School Leaders and any educators interested to learn new skills with wood. It will be run by Simon Clements, Wood Carver based at the Sylva Wood Centre, supported by the Sylva Foundation.

knife whittling workshop

knife whittling workshop

During this workshop you will:

  • Learn to make your own whittling knife with a wooden handle (blades provided)
  • Learn how to care for knives including sharpening

About the tutor:

Simon Clements is a Wood Carver based at the Sylva Wood Centre, and is keen support Forest School Leaders in developing their skills with wood. He trained as a potter and came to carving via boat building and has a background in education.

Where:

The Sylva Wood Centre, Long Wittenham, OX14 4QT (see map)

When:

The course will be run on:

  • Thursday 6th October 4pm  – 7pm

Cost:

£30.00 per person

This cost includes all materials, tuition and tea/coffee.

Please bring:

  • Your own penknife or whittling knife.

Booking:

Book your place online via Charity Checkout

 

 


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myForest at Forest School Association national conference

posted on October 2, 2014

We had an extremely enthusiastic response to the launch of myForest for Educators from many of the 200 Forest School Leaders present at the Forest School Association conference 26-28th September at Danbury Outdoor Centre, Essex.

 

myForest for Educators training day

myForest for Educators training day

Our Education Manager Jen Hurst, and Oxfordshire Forest School Service Forest School trainer Sarah Lawfull, presented myForest to 20 Forest School trainers at their national network meeting and ran practical myForest workshops for Forest School Leaders from across the country. Workshop participants produced inventories and management plans for their forest school sites and were impressed by the accessibility of the myForest tools. Many Forest School Leaders expressed how valuable myForest would be to them:

 

“myForest will not only be useful for managing our forest school site but it will also show the organisations that we work with that we are serious about woodland management. It is so great to have an organisation like Sylva behind us with training, advice and links into forestry.”

Forest School Trainer and Leader, London.

 

An unexpected and exciting outcome from the weekend was realising the potential to take myForest into the classroom as an educational tool. One practitioner commented:

“I am not going to train the teachers how to use myForest … I will train the young people to use it so they can do their own woodland management plans!”

Countryside Ranger, Scotland.

 

Several Educators identified the many curriculum links they could make using myForest with young people at primary and secondary levels such as Geography (mapping), Maths (inventory), English (reporting), Science (tree identification and ecological impact assessment), and ICT. Both Sylva and the Forest School Association believe that empowering young people to manage their forest school sites will give them a deeper connection to their sites, provide a real life decision making task as well as educating them in woodland management, ecology and forestry.

The feedback gained from Forest School Leaders at the conference will be crucial in shaping the new version of myForest for Educators which we plan to launch in March 2015. In partnership with the Forest School Association we will support Forest School trainers across the country with myForest so that hundreds of Forest School Leaders will learn to use it. In the meantime if any Forest Leaders or Educators would like to use myForest and provide further feedback we would value your input – contact jen@sylva.org.uk . Development and dissemination of myForest for Educators has been made possible by the Patsy Wood Trust.

Thanks go to the Forest School Association for the organisation of a successful conference and Sylva looks forward to continuing our partnership with them over the coming year.

Read more about Sylva’s education work

 


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myForest for Educators launched

posted on September 29, 2014
FS Leaders and myForest for Educators

FS Leaders and myForest for Educators

As a direct outcome of our partnership with the FSA (see recent news) we have launched the myForest for Educators at the FSA National Conference in Essex.

On September 27th our Education Manager Jen Hurst ran myForest woodland management workshops for Forest School Leaders. Bringing myForest to the UK’s Forest School community will build a much-needed bridge between the worlds of forestry and education and go a long way to reviving Britain’s wood culture by reaching thousands of young people and educators.

For more information on Forest Schools visit Forest School Association.


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Raising funds for Forest School via Love Trees Love Wood

posted on September 17, 2014

Our joint fundraising campaign with the Forest School Association, via the crowdfunding portal Indiegogo, ended recently. We are pleased to report that the total raised was £1250.00. Although this sum falls short of our fundraising target on Indiegogo we are continuing to fundraise via the Big Give

Support from donors has been crucial in launching the UK’s first ever national campaign to increase the number of young people participating in Forest Schools. The campaign has enabled two charities, the Sylva Foundation and the Forest School Association, to produce an awareness-raising film about the value and urgent need for Forest Schools in the UK. The funds raised on Indiegogo have covered the cost of producing the film and promoting it through our own websites, networks and social media. So thanks to all of you who helped us to get the campaign off the ground!

The good news is that this is not the end of the campaign but just the start. The Sylva Foundation and Forest School Association (FSA) will continue to fundraise together for Forest Schools. Funds raised through the Big Give will be used to support Forest Schools most in need, as described in the original Indiegogo campaign. The campaign film is also a way for us to raise the national profile of Forest Schools and provide benefits to both young people and our forests.


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Tackling nature-deficit disorder in Britain’s children

posted on July 4, 2014

 

Two charities promoting environmental education have formed a partnership to tackle ‘nature-deficit disorder’ in Britain’s children.

Young people today often are disconnected from the natural world – a condition coined by American author Richard Louv[1] as ‘nature-deficit disorder’ – leading to multiple issues affecting physical and mental wellbeing, fear of the outdoors, and fundamentally a lack of a meaningful relationship with the environment.

The Forest School Association and the Sylva Foundation have launched a fundraising campaign: Love Trees Love Wood. They aim to raise £30,000 via the crowdfunding site Indiegogo to support existing Forest Schools and to establish more sites across the country, especially in areas of deprivation and in inner cities. Currently there is no funding specifically for Forest Schools in the UK. School budgets are ever tighter. Forest Schools are not government-funded. The crowdsourcing campaign is the only one of its kind in the UK and will generate the only fund set up specifically to support Forest Schools.

Sylva Foundation CEO Dr Gabriel Hemery said

“the Forest School movement is the single most powerful vehicle for environmental education in Britain today.” He continued “We aim to increase the number of Forest Schools in areas of the country where there are few or no Forest Schools, and also to support Forest School leaders in caring for their woodland sites.”

Without Forest Schools our children face a crisis. A recent NHS study revealed that one-in-five children are obese by the time they leave primary school[2]. The Nuffield Foundation (2013) reported that the proportion of young people reporting frequent feelings of depression or anxiety has increased in recent years – doubling between the mid 1980s and the mid 2000s. In 2009 Natural England carried out an extensive study into how children’s contact with the natural world and play patterns have changed:

  • Children spend less time playing in natural places, such as woodlands, countryside and heaths, than they did in previous generations.
  • Less than 10% play in such places compared to 40% of adults when they were young.
  • Children today would like more freedom to play outside (81%).
  • Nearly half of the children say they are not allowed to play outside unsupervised and nearly a quarter are worried to be out alone.

Jon Cree, Chair of the Forest School Association, said

“there is increasing evidence of how Forest School makes an effective learning programme, and improves children’s confidence and their ability to problem solve. Through the Love Trees Love Wood campaign we aim to increase Forest School provision around the country, by providing sites with equipment such as waterproofs, wellies and tools, and provide more training for educators, parents or carers.”

Forest School child:

“I have learned all I ever needed here, from how to make stuff to how important trees and wood are for my life and health.”

Please support our campaign

Support the Love Trees Love Wood campaign

Support the campaign – add this banner to your website or email signature (right-click and “save image as”)

 

 

 

 


[1] Louv, R. (2010). Last child in the woods. Atlantic Books. ISBN 978-1848870833 richardlouv.com/books/last-child

[2] http://www.theguardian.com/society/2011/dec/14/children-obese-primary-school-nhs


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