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Membership offers available through myForest

posted on November 14, 2014

Small Woods Association and Royal Forestry Society membership offers, launched earlier this year, are still available through myForest.

myForest is a free web-based platform offering mapping and management tools for woodland owners and managers. Since May, existing and new users of myForest have been eligible to join the Royal Forestry Society and the Small Woods Association at a discounted rate. Many myForest users have taken up the opportunity to join both membership organisations and the offers remain open to anyone who has signed up to the myForest Service (providing that they have not recently been a member of the organisation they wish to join).

RFS & Small Woods  membership offers

RFS & Small Woods membership offers

The partnership reflects the different specialisms and interests of the three partner organisations. The Royal Forestry Society and Small Woods Association are both membership organisations; together supporting over 6,000 woodland owners. The Sylva Foundation does not offer a membership but runs the myForest Service providing over 2,000 woodland owners and managers with simple yet powerful tools to help them manage their woodlands.

Full details about the offers are available via the myForest website:  www.myforest.org.uk/membership-offer

 

 


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Partnership launched between three forestry organisations

posted on April 16, 2014

Three major organisations serving public interests in forestry, have come together forming a powerful partnership to foster sustainable forest management in Britain. The Royal Forestry Society, Small Woods Association and the Sylva Foundation will be working together to support woodland owners in caring for their woodlands.

The majority (72%) of all forested land in the UK is owned and managed by private woodland owners. Ensuring that our woodlands are resilient to future challenges ‒ including pests, pathogens, and climate change ‒ while also being capable of supporting biodiversity and producing timber, requires the active engagement and support of owners. In England alone, around 47% of woodlands are considered either un‐managed or under‐managed. Bringing these woodlands back into good condition through sustainable woodland management will be integral to growing a new ‘wood culture’, providing more jobs in the forestry sector, improving woodland habitats for nature and creating more places for people to exercise and enjoy the countryside.

The partnership reflects the different specialisms and interests of the three partner organisations. The Royal Forestry Society and Small Woods Association are both membership organisations; together supporting over 6000 woodland owners. The Sylva Foundation does not offer a membership but runs the myForest Service – a free web-based platform offering mapping and management tools for woodland owners and managers: www.myforest.org.uk

From today, existing and new users of the myForest Service will be eligible to join the Royal Forestry Society and the Small Woods Association at a discounted rate. The offers are open to anyone who has signed up to the myForest Service, providing that they have not recently been a member of the organisation they wish to join. Full details about the offers are available via the myForest website: www.myforest.org.uk/membership-offer

 

Left to right: Gabriel Hemery (Sylva), Alistair Yeomans (Sylva), Simon Lloyd (RFS), Mike Bentley (Small Woods) and Paul Orsi (Sylva) celebrate the formation of the partnership.

Left to right: Gabriel Hemery (Sylva), Alistair Yeomans (Sylva), Simon Lloyd (RFS), Mike Bentley (Small Woods) and Paul Orsi (Sylva) celebrate the formation of the partnership.

Dr Gabriel Hemery, chief executive of Sylva, said “It is a significant step for Britain’s woodlands, and for those that care for them, that our organisations are able to work together in this way for the first time. By collaborating we are able to bring together the management tools of myForest with the benefits of two great membership organisations.”

Simon Lloyd, director of the RFS said “We are delighted to be teaming up with Sylva Foundation to be able to offer those new to woodland management the opportunity to combine the benefits of myForest’s online management planning tools with the opportunity visit woodlands and learn about all aspects of woodland management from the experiences of a network of 3,500 RFS members. We believe well managed woods which produce sustainable quantities of quality timber, wood fuel and other products are better for nature conservation, better for people and better for the economy.”  www.rfs.org.uk

Mike Bentley, chief executive of the Small Woods Association said “We warmly welcome the chance to team up with Sylva and the RFS in this joint effort to help more people manage their woodlands. Sylva’s free woodland mapping and planning tool is already being used by some of our members to great effect and we are keen to offer our unique range of membership benefits to all other users of myForest. Small Woods are a friendly and approachable membership organisation offering support and advice to owners, practitioners and enthusiasts with different backgrounds, objectives and levels of experience. I am sure many myForest users will find us as their natural home and this is why we are very happy to offer them an introductory membership discount.” www.smallwoods.org.uk

Read more about the membership offer


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Impact of grey squirrels on trees and woods – have your say

posted on December 4, 2013

Forestry Commission England is reviewing policy on squirrel control. Currently this is to protect red squirrels, not trees.

In support of this policy review, the Royal Forestry Society is calling for evidence from woodland owners and managers of their experience and views of the impact of grey squirrels on trees and woods.

Your views are crucially important to help influence policy development. Please take a few minutes to answer these 14 questions in an online survey.

 

 


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Royal Forestry Society backs SilviFuture

posted on December 3, 2013

The Royal Forestry Society has joined our partnership supporting SilviFuture– an online database promoting and sharing knowledge about novel timber tree species growing in real forestry conditions.

Royal Forestrry Society

Royal Forestry Society

The RFS is also backing a UK-wide drive to ask woodland owners to share useful information on the SilviFuture site on more than 60 lesser known or ‘novel’ tree types, many of which have been growing, almost forgotten, amongst more popular timber trees in private and public woodlands around the country.

RFS Development Director Simon Lloyd says: “With increased challenges to forestry from climate change, pests and disease, it is vital that woodland owners share knowledge about trees species which may prove resilient and become the timber crops of the future.”

The database, created by The Sylva Foundation, The Silvanus Trust, Forest Research and Forestry Commission England, will prove an invaluable tool to foresters looking to decide which species to plant to develop resilient and financially viable woodlands.

A stand of sugi at Brechfa forest garden

A stand of sugi or Japanese red-cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) at Brechfa forest garden. Just one of over 60 species now listed on the online database.

The RFS will be entering data from its Coast Redwoods in Leighton, mid Wales; data on some of the 50 trees species at its Hockeridge and Pancake Woods  on the edge of the Chilterns, and from young new woodlands at Battram in the National Forest where plantings began in 1999. Forest Research, Forest Enterprise England and others are also adding their data.

Simon Lloyd added: “We are urging all our members to do the same, and we are exploring the potential for bursaries that would provide support for forestry students to help private woodland owners add data to the site. This could provide valuable work experience for students and save woodland owners time and effort to record their data.”

As the database grows, foresters and woodland owners will be able to search by species using a range of parameters such as ‘durable timber’ or ‘poor drainage’ plus site data such as altitude, aspect or soil and mensuration data including tree height, dbh or stocking density.

The more data added by landowners and foresters, the more the database will prove of use to us all in the future.


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