OneOak charcoal

posted on October 26, 2011

A very successful OneOak charcoal burn and training event was held recently at the University of Oxford Harcourt Arboretum. The event was managed by Alex and Lisa of Chew Valley Charcoal (read more about the preparations).

The charcoal kiln site viewed from the top of a nearby oak tree

The charcoal kiln site viewed from the top of a nearby oak tree

The charcoal kiln fille to the brim with OneOak branchwood

The charcoal kiln filled to the brim with OneOak branchwood. The lid lies behind.

The kiln soon after lighting. The smoke is cold and very wet so sinks to the ground.

The charcoal kiln soon after lighting. The smoke is cold and very wet so sinks to the ground. Notice that the chimneys are still blocked and the lid propped open.

The charcoal kiln has heated up and the smoke starts to rise. It is quite dark in colour, indicating that it is still full of moisture.

The charcoal kiln has heated up and the smoke starts to rise. It is quite dark in colour, indicating that it is still full of moisture.

As with all good charcoal burns, a nearby fire is lit to provide heat and for cooking. Two volunteers on the charcoal-making course enjoy a break.

As with all good charcoal burns, a nearby fire is lit to provide warmth and for cooking. Two volunteers on the charcoal-making course enjoy a break.

As the night sets in the draw of air changes in the kiln. Now hot smoke pours from the side chimneys.

As the night sets in the draw of air changes in the charcoal kiln. Now hot smoke pours from the side chimneys.

 

Branchwood from the OneOak tree was mixed with sycamore wood to fill the kiln; charcoal from the two different woods being separated later.

A total of 28 bags, each containing 4kg of OneOak charcoal, were produced after the 48 hour burn. More photos will be posted soon.

Chew Valley Charcoal

 


2 Comments

  1. […] charcoal […]

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  2. […] date: firewood, woodchip (to heat a house for 6 weeks), sawdust for smoking food by Raymond Blanc, charcoal, bracing beams for a house, transom beam in a boat rowed in the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Flotilla, […]

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Category: OneOak project, Wood

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